Home


Order a DNA test here

Contact : snorton@nortonfamily.net

DNA Test Results (new format)
Link to FTdna results

White Mulberry Johnston
Fancher Origins Website
Fancher Family Website

Research:
Research - Tinker - Fancher Connection


DNA Relationship of the Fancher and Johnston families
W
hen we began the Fancher DNA Project, we noticed that there seemed to be a lot of mutations between the tests. As we have increased the number of tests and also the number of markers tested a very clear picture of the Fancher DNA signature has evolved.

Along the way we found a Y-DNA relationship with the Johnston family represented as the "White Mulberry" group on the Johnson DNA Project. There is a positive Y-DNA relationship with this group of Johnstons. But are they from the same family and how far back.

For this we have to go to another form of DNA genealogy. This is the SNP test. SNP's (snips) are the most refined DNA test for relationship you can get. The Johnston's and Fanchers share the lowest level SNP which is the R-L21. If you look at the L21 population map below, it's easy to see where this family comes from. We're talking Scotland, Ireland and NW England. The Johnston pedigrees mostly originate from Northern Ireland and Scotland. It appears they were "Border Rievers".
L-21 population Map
Haplotree Map

However, a new series of test have become available that allow us to drill down further. The discovery of the SNP DF13 has split L21 into a very large DF13+ group and a thus far much smaller DF13- group. All of the known L21 subclades except DF63 are DF13+, meaning they are downstream of DF13, as well as L21. 

Fanchers and our Johnston member need to test for the L21 subclades,
These are found under "Advanced Tests" on your FTdna page. The test type is "SNP", and search for "DF13".

Positive test in RED
Fancher 41836 --- SNP Pedigree= P312+, L23+,L21+ SNP tests taken= L1-, L21+, L23+, M222-, M37-, P312+, P66-, U106-, U152-
Fancher 101343 -- SNP Pedigree= P312+, L23+,L21+ SNP tests taken= L1-, L144-, L159.2-, L176.2-, L193-, L21+, L226-, L23+, L96-, M222-, M37-, P312+
Johnson N10959 - SNP Pedigree= P312+, L23+,L21+, DF13+, DF49?,DF23+ SNP tests taken= DF13+, DF21-, DF23+, L1-, L144-, L159.2-, L193-, L2-, L20-, L21+, L226-, L23+

So what we see is that Johnston and Fancher test positive down to L21+.
What we need now is for Fanchers to test for SNP DF13+ to see if we match Johnston to this level. There are only 4 out of 1400 in this group on the L21 Project Group. That's narrowing it down.

Here is the Haplotree below L21
DF13
------ DF49
------ ------ DF23
------ ------ ------ M222

Fancher Genealogy
Fancher Research Links

reference (1) (best documented references)

reference (2) web page The Fancher Family by Beverley Githens
reference (3) web page (very good research, follows ref 1)
reference (4) web page (very good research, follows ref 1)

reference (5) web page (not good research - a compilation of everyones gedcom)
reference (6) web page (not good research - a compilation of everyones gedcom)

Pedigree

Lyonel Fanshawe
1590 in Denby, Derbyshire, England
Death Mar 1653
http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/18738196/person/18020706423

 
DNA
151235

DNA
67914

DNA
220451
 
DNA
259442

DNA
113572

DNA
41836

DNA
117623

DNA
101343
William Fancy
b. 1621
d, 1677
m1. Goodwife Fancy, New Haven, CT b. ? d. April 14, 1646 New Haven, CT
children:
Samual

m2.
Katherine
Joseph
Hannah
William, Jr.
Rachel
   
DNA
151235

DNA
67914

DNA
220451
 
DNA
259442

DNA
113572

DNA
41836

DNA
117623

DNA
101343


William Fancy (Fanshaw)
b. 1655
d. 1730
 Brookhaven, Suffolk, New York, USA

m. Abigail

children:
Joseph
David 1698 –
Richard 1700 – 1764
John
1710 – 1779

     
DNA
151235

DNA
67914
DNA
220451
DNA
259442

John Fancher •Test #67914 Test #151235 (This line is distinguished by DYS 391 = 12)
b. 26 Jun 1710 in Danbury, Fairfield, CT
d. 4 Feb 1779 in Poundridge, Westchester, New York,


m. Eunice Bouton

chilldren:
William Fanshaw 1735 – 1737
John Fanshaw 1737 – 1808
William Fanshaw 1739 – 1820
Nathaniel Fanshaw 1742 – 1820
Abigail Fanshaw 1744 – 1779
David Fanshaw 1747 – 1784
Eunice Fanshaw 1749 – 1779
Joseph Fanshaw 1749 – 1779
Mercy Mary Fanshaw 1752 – 1839
Daniel Fanshaw 1755 – 1781
Elijah Fanshaw 1757 – 1830

     
DNA
151235
Joseph Fancher
b. abt 23 Jul 1749 in Stamford, Fairfield, C
d. 1 Feb 1779 in Pound Ridge, Westchester, New York
     
DNA
151235
Daniel Fancher (1784-1858) Test #151235
     
DNA
151235
William Henry Fancher (1811-1867) Test #151235
     
DNA
151235
Samuel Henry Fancher (1849-1918) Test #151235
     
DNA
151235
Samuel Henry, Jr. Fancher (1886-1948) Test #151235
     
DNA
151235
William Sumner Fancher (1916-2006) Test #151235
       
DNA
67914
DNA
259442
JOHN FANCHER Test #679144 (DYS 391 = 12) (B.1737 - D. 1808)
         
DNA
67914
DNA
259442
PETER FANCHER •Test #67914 (DYS 391 = 12) (B.1767 - D. 1859)
           
DNA
67914
SETH FANCHER Test #67914 (DYS 391 = 12) (B. 1787 - D.1870)
             
DNA
67914
JACOB W. FANCHER •Test #67914 (DYS 391 = 12) (B. 1817 D.1880)
               
DNA
67914
HARVEY S. FANCHER •Test #67914 (DYS 391 = 12) B.1858 -
           
DNA
259442
Jonathan W FANCHER Test #259442 (B. 1803 Renssalaer, NY - D.1875 Merced, CA)
             
DNA
259442
Charles W FANCHER Test #259442 (B. 1844 Cisero, NY - D.1925 San Jose, CA)
               
DNA
259442
Earle C FANCHER Test #259442 (B. 1866 Anita, IA - D.194 San Jose, CA)
       
DNA
220451
Elijah Fancher (1757-1830)
         
DNA
220451
Elias Fancher (1789-1875)
           
DNA
220451
Edmond Meade Fancher (1810-1886)
             
DNA
220451
George Washington Fancher (1846-1923)
               
DNA
220451
Leon Livermore Fancher (1867-1930)
     
DNA
113572

DNA
41836

DNA
117623

DNA
101343


Richard Fancher •Test 41836 Test 101343 Test 113572 Test 117623 (This line is distinguished by DYS 391 = 11) (1)
b.1700-05, CT
d. 29 Oct 1764 in Roxbury, Morris, New Jersey, USA
m. Martha
- Richard1 Fancher was not born in Morris Co. NJ. His birth is estimated to be 1700 to 1705, he was in Stamford, CT 1728 to 1736/7 and did not arrive in Morris Co. NJ until around 1741. (1) - Richard Fancher lived in Roxbury Township, Morris County, New Jersey where he died in 1764. When he made his will October 29, 1764, he was in ill health, and he died before November 12, 1764 when the will was probated in Morris County. His will names his wife as Martha. (3)
          1. Captain Richard (twin), born August 17, 1731. (3)
          2. Martha (twin), born August 17, 1731; probably married John Bell, an appraiser of Richard Fancher's estate in 1778. (3)
          3. William (twin), baptized October 19, 1735 in Stamford Congregational Church; probably died before 1744. (3)
       
DNA
113572

DNA
41836
4. BenjaminTest 41836 Test 113572 (DYS 391 = 11)
b. Oct 19, 1735
d. abt 1805 Sevier, TN
m. Sarah
- (twin), baptized October 19, 1735, Stamford Congregational Church. (3) - Benjamin Fancher was born in New Canaan, Connecticut and baptized October 19, 1735 in the New Canaan Congregational Church. He is believed to have died in Sevier County, Tennessee about 1805. He married Sarah _____. (4) - born 19 Oct 1735 in Stamford, Fairfield CT. He died 1809 in Overton, TN (6)
            1.Richard, born April 19, 1767; died August 21, 1849, Bibb County, Alabama; married Mary _____.(4) (6)
            2.Samuel, born 1767; died in Bibb County, Alabama after 1850; married Phebe Adams.(4) (6)
            3. Sarah, born 1768; married February 3, 1792 in Knox County, Tennessee to John Hiser, a Revolutionary Soldier. Sarah Hiser received a pension on his service. John Hiser, born Berks County, Pennsylvania 1759 or 1760 and died in Barren County, Kentucky, March 5, 1839. They moved from Sequatchie Valley, Tennessee to Kentucky about 1812. She is buried in the Hiser Cemetery near Center, Kentucky. Ten children.(4) (6)
            4. Jacob, born 1776; used surname Fanshier. He was first and earliest person in the Fanshier Family. From him spring all those bearing this name. He married first Martha _____ and next Rachel Price. Son Thomas, never married, used name Fancher. Sons George and John used name Fanshier. Probable son Calvin Morgan used name Fanchier.(4) (6)
            5.John Fancher, deceased by November 1794 Term of court in Bourbon County, Kentucky; married Margaret _____ (Probably McGee). (4) (6)
            6. Sophia Fancher b.1765 (This is my suggestion)
m.abt 1784 David Norton
         
DNA
113572
7 David Fancher, Test 113572
b. 1770 to 1780;
d. March 1850, Rush County, Indiana;
married Elizabeth Dobbin
s.(4) (6)
            7. James S. FANCHER was born 1794 and died 22 Oct 1850. (6) (doubtful)
            8. Job Fancher,Test 41836 (This line is distinguished by DYS 391 = 10) born about 1780; died Fort Williams, Alabama in 1814; married Rebecca Fryer.(4) (6)
              ? Test 113572 (DYS 391 = 11)
                ? Test 113572 (DYS 391 = 11)
            7. James S. FANCHER was born 1794 and died 22 Oct 1850. (6) (doubtful)
         
DNA
41836

8. Job Fancher,Test 41836 (This line is distinguished by DYS 391 = 10)
b. about 1780;
d. Fort Williams, Alabama in 1814;
m. Rebecca Fryer
.(4) (6)

           
DNA
41836
Benjamin Fancher Test 41836 (DYS 391 = 10)
b.1804
             
DNA
41836
John E Fancher Test 41836 (DYS 391 = 10)
b.1845
d.1927
          5. Abigail, baptized February 20, 1736/7. Probably died young because she was not mentioned in her father's will. (3)
          6. Amy Fancher, unmarried in October 1764. (3)
          7. William Fancher, born October 9, 1744, Morris County. (3)
       
DNA
117623

DNA
101343
8. David FancherTest 101343 Test 117623 (DYS 391 = 11) (1) (2)
b. abt 1738 (3)
- David Fancher, son of the immigrant Richard, migrated to Virginia, where he. received a grant of land from Governor Patrick Henry. David's son Richard lived in Virginia and North Caroline be fore moving on westward to Tennessee.(2)
- David Fancher was born about 1738 and married in Morris or Sussex County, New Jersey to Hannah _____. He probably moved to Sussex County before 1763 when a son was born there. Children, born in New Jersey: (4)
         
DNA
117623

DNA
101343
1. Richard Fancher Test 101343 Test 117623 (DYS 391 = 11)
b. 1756 Stamfort, CT > PA (1)
m. Sarah Jernagan (Journegin).(4) b. Spottsylvania, VA (1)
- Capt. Richard2, was not born in Morris Co., NJ either, his baptismal record in Canaan Parish Church in Stamford, CT is 3 years after his birth in 1731, and 10 years before the family removed to NJ.(1) Richard3 served in the Eighth Regiment of VA during the Revolution. There has been no record found of this family in PA (1)
-
Richard, grandson of the immigrant (1756-1829) served seven years in the American Revolution in Colonel Bowman's Eighth Regiment of Virginia. He was with Sergeant Jasper at Fort Moultrie when the flag pole was shot by a British ball. He retrieved the flag and held it in place until the pole could be spliced Richard died in Overton County, Tennessee; his wife Sarah, of Spottsylvania County, Virginia, died at Osage, Ark., in 1839. (2)
           
DNA
101343

DNA
117623
James FancherTest 101343 Test 117623 (DYS 391 = 11)
b.1790 Stokes, NC (1)
James, was born in 1790 in North Carolina. He married in Rock Springs, Tennessee. In 1838 he moved to Carroll County, Arkansas, and lived there until his death in 1866. He served, incidentally, in the War of 1812. He was 70 years old at the outbreak of the Civil War and in 1863 he lost most of his property (2)
             
DNA
117623
Thomas Washington Fancher Test 101343 Test 117623 (DYS 391 = 11)
b. 1833 Overton, TN
Thomas was born in 1833 in Tennessee. He married Elizabeth Sneed in Osage, AR. He was an officer in the Civil War in Harrell’s Arkansas Cavalry. He died in 1892 as the result of a stab wound from a fellow Mason. He’s buried in Osage, Carroll Co., AR.
            2. Isaac, born December 27, 1760, Morris County; married Margaret McCollom.
            3. James, born September 19, 1763, Sussex County; married Ruth White.
            4. John, deceased by November 1794 Term of court in Bourbon County, Kentucky; married Margaret _____ (Probably McGee).(5) (doubtful)
                   

William Fancher/Fanshaw
Fancher Family name found in Connecticut about 1728 was spelled predominately as Fanshaw until about 1740 and Fanshaw and Fancy as late as 1760.  The English pronounced Fanshaw as "Fanshur" or "Fanshore" which easily evolved to Fancher and Fansher in a time of our country when a large part of the population could not read  nor write or had very little formal school education.  The family tradition of Richard  and John Fancher coming from Long Island to Connecticut and  evidence of Fanshaw Family on Long Island and many other bits of  information give  credence to this connection with our ancestors.

William Fancy was an early settler in the New Haven Colony. Originally called Quinnipiac, the settlement was founded by a company of five hundred English Puritans in 1638 that hoped to create a Christian utopia; and with its large harbor, establish a commercial empire to control Long Island Sound. It was the first planned community in North America, based on a grid of nine square miles. Conforming to the old English custom, a central square, or Green, was laid out as a public common. By 1641, a complete government had been established and the settlement, renamed New Haven, had grown into a community of eight hundred.

The first records for William and Goodwife Fancy appear in the New Haven Colony in 1643. On May 5, 1643 the New Haven records indicate that "Will Fancie his wife" was charged with stealing various things. Goodwife Fancy confessed that she had taken about 5,000 pins, diverse parcels of linens, and a jug valued at 17 shillings from Mrs. Lamberton. From Mrs. Gilbert, she had taken two pillow bears and a shift when the family was at prayer. It was ordered that she be severely whipped and make restitution to the people involved.

This same New Haven record also mentions that she had been previously whipped twice at "Conectecutt", which would appear to indicate that William and/or his wife had been in the Connecticut Colony prior to the New Haven Colony. The given name and maiden name of Goodwife Fancy is not known, but the extant Connecticut Colony records do not include any references to Fancy. It is possible that Goodwife Fancy was in Connecticut Colony prior to her marriage.

William Fancy took the Oath of Fidelity to New Haven on July 1, 1644. There is evidence that William Fancy and his wife had been living with Lt. Robert Seeley, probably around 1644. Later, they were living with Thomas Clark, and may also have been living with, and/or working for, Thomas Robinson and Stephen Metcalfe.

In December 1645, Goodwife Fancy testified in a hearing involving Stephen Metcalfe, relating to the loss of an eye Metcalfe sustained from an accident with a gun. It would appear Goodwife Fancy was nursing Metcalfe at the time. Later, on March 2, 1646, William Fancy testified regarding a debt due to John Sackett from Metcalfe.

On April 7, 1646, there was a complaint against William Fancy and four other men for the disorderly drinking of strong liquor. William Fancy "owned it as his sin his oft drinking, being that at the first he felt it hott in his throate, but he was not distempred, howevr submits to ye court."

In April 1646, the Governor being informed of several lewd passages, ordered William Fancy and his wife to appear at court to answer for them. In the testimony, Goodwife Fancy related several incidents when townsmen accosted her and attempted to commit adultery with her. William Fancy said he was aware of the matter, but advised his wife to keep silent because he thought no one would believe her. One of the accused, Thomas Robinson, had offered the Fancys a bribe to keep quiet, and then ran away from New Haven before the hearing. Another of the men Goodwife Fancy accused, Mark Meggs, was sentenced to be whipped. The Court sentenced "Goodie" Fancy to be severely whipped for concealing the "lustfull attempts" and William Fancy to also be severely whipped for neglecting to reveal the attempts in a timely manner, or allowing his wife to do so.

William Fancy left New Haven after 1646 and by 1652 had purchased a house and 2-1/2 acre lot in Southold, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. Robert Smith originally owned the house, and then sold the house to John Budd, who in turn sold it to William Fancy.

Whitaker’s Southold includes William Fancy in the list of Southold’s early settlers. Southold also makes reference to William Fancy leaving Southold for Brookhaven – "Of the full-grown men who lived here and left their record in the annals of this Town… not a few removed to other places and became important factors and elements in the settlement and life of other towns. John Tucker... became one of the early settlers of the Town of Brookhaven, Long Island, and so did William Fansey, John Budd, Arthur Smyth, Robert Akerly and John Frost."

In December 1657 William Fancy witnessed a deed for William Salmon, which was recorded in Southold. William Fancy does not appear on the Southold List of Inhabitants in 1658, so it is probable that he left Southold by that time.

In 1661, William Fancy appears on the list of land proprietors in Setauket and is credited with being one of the first settlers of that place.

Setauket began as an English Puritan colony called Ashford, with the 1655 purchase of land from the Seatalcott Indians by six men acting as agents for the others. Fifty-five men, including William Fancy, then began the settlement of "the old town" which became Setauket. These families were all "strongly imbued with Puritan doctrines and zealously devoted to a strict observance of its tenants", and were English immigrants who came primarily from the vicinity of Boston, Southold, and Southampton.

Lots were laid out for each family around the Meeting House green. Each man paid for a home lot, called an "accommodation" and a right of commonage. Town meetings were the only method of government. No one was permitted to sell his land to a stranger, and outsiders could not become residents unless they were admitted by popular vote. Seating in the Meeting House was dictated by law. In Setauket’s New England type of government, church and state were very firmly united.

Today, the unincorporated village of Setauket is located in the "Three Village" area in the northwest portion of Brookhaven Town. Brookhaven is the largest "town" on Long Island today. It occupies the entire width of central Long Island from the Long Island Sound to the Atlantic Ocean

Every acre of land in New York is located in one of the state’s 60+ counties. Every county is subdivided into towns, which include every bit of land in the county. Within a town, there are cities, villages, and communities called towns that contain only a portion of the county/town in their area. There is much land outside these communities, called rural land or farmland that is not included in any political subdivision. Setauket is a small village that was the original community in Brookhaven Town in Suffolk County. The earliest records of Brookhaven are the records of "Old Town" or Setauket as it is known today.

Records of William Fancy at Setauket begin in 1661 when he drew lot 13, a 6-acre lot in the "Old Field", in the first land draw at Setauket. The settlers had banded together and pooled their money to buy a large tract of land from the Indians. A selected piece of this land was surveyed and laid out in lots. The number of lots created was equal to the number of the town’s proprietors. In the later draws, there were 55 lots laid out, which were numbered from 1 to 55. William Fancy is recorded as being entitled to one share. The lottery was to determine which lot a proprietor received, not whether he received a lot. Included in the lottery were those who had provided money in the first land draw in 1661.

William Fancy’s land draws:

1661 - Land in the Old Field, 6-acre lots (#13)
1667 - Lots in Newtown (East Setauket) (#6)
1667 - Land in the Old Field, Second Division (#11)
1667 - West Line (#4)
1674 - Old Purchase of Meadow at the South (#4)
1675 - New Purchase at the South (#28)

In addition to his original Home Lot within the settlement, and the 1661 land in the Old Field, by 1675 there were five additional land draws from the original purchase in which William Fancy received a share. As the settlement grew, additional land purchases with names like Ould Mans and Fireplace, were made.

Fearing attacks from Indians crossing the Sound, the early Setauket settlers built their houses on their "Home Lots" further inland, and left their animals to graze on the common pastureland called "Old Field". The name "Fireplace" came from the fires lit along the western edge of Carmans River to guide whaling ships safely to shore. Today Mt. Sinai occupies the place that was once called "Ould Mans", or Old Mans. And in Brookhaven, in 1747, there is a reference to "water at ye place called Fancie’s Hole".

In addition to the lands he received in the drawings, in 1669 the Town voted to give William Fancy ten acres next to Robert Smith.

William Fancy’s name also appears on the following land lot drawings, although, with the exception of the Meadows at ye Olde Mans Beach by William Fancy’s widow, in each case the name of the person who was actually exercising William Fancy’s Proprietor’s Rights is not recorded.

Meadows at ye Olde Mans Beach (Widow Fancy #25)
Fireplace Meadows (#23)
Meadows on the East Side of "Conetecut" River, ye last division (#12)
Wading Rivers Meadows, the last division (#18)
Upland on the East Side of the "Conetticutt" River (#4)
Meadows laid out by Moses Burnet and William Helms, the last division (#26)
Southside, running between Smithtown line and Connecticut Hollow (#25)
South, between Winthrop Line and Connecticut River, East Division (Great Division) (#27)
South, between Winthrop Line and Connecticut River, West Division (Little Division) (#10)
Smithtown Line and Wading River, West Division (#51)
Skirst (Skirt) Division (#20
Old Mans Sheep Pasture (#7)
West Meadow Neck Division (#10)
Pasture Division in Town (#2)
Long Swamp, south side of the country road near David Brewster Jr. (#7)
East Side of the head of Connecticut River (#53)
East Side of south path near Nasakique Swamp (#18)
South side of Mr. Phillips 100 acres near Nasakique (#52)
Meadow on South Beach, 3 Chain, 74 links wide (32)
Wading River Great Lots (31)
East Division of Long Lots (39)

William Fancy signed papers with a Z mark, or with a ^ markFrom his arrival in Setauket until his death there about 1678 when his Will was proved, William Fancy’s name appears in the town records participating in many routine activities, such as agreeing to a Town Arbitration Board to settle land disputes, signing a petition for a corn-grinding mill in 1664, and pledging 7 shillings to encourage a blacksmith to settle there in 1667.

It is estimated that William Fancy’s marriage to his second wife Katherine probably took place between 1652 and 1658. Town records relating to William Fancy’s son Samuel Fanshaw/Fancy, call Samuel Katherine’s son-in-law (meant as step-son). Katherine’s maiden name is unknown. Because of the interaction between the families, there is speculation that she may have been a Smith, sister to Arthur Smith "The Quaker" and Robert Smith. If that was the case, it seems likely that Katherine met and married William Fancy in Southold. (In 1659 Arthur Smith sold his house in Southold and was admitted as a townsman of Setauket in December 1659. In 1661 Arthur Smith and William Fancy were on the list of 22 men who received 6 acre lots at Old Field.) In 1674 Katherine Fancy made a deposition that said she was "aged about 48", which places her birth sometime around 1626.

In August 1661, Katherine Fancy had an action of slander entered against her. George Woods, Jr. asked for 30 pounds damages. This is the first instance where William’s second wife’s given name is used.

William Fancy was fined 10 shillings for lying to the country in December of 1663, the following year ten acres were given to William Fancy by the town. About 1665, William appeared on a tax list. On July 14, 1669 it was recorded that William Fancy’s "eare mark is a swallows taiele".

William Fancy’s children are recorded in his June 17, 1675 Will as Samuel, Joseph, Hannah, Rachel, and William, Jr. Based on the evidence in Brookhaven Town records, Samuel and Joseph are believed to be William Fancy’s sons by his first (unknown) wife. Samuel Fanshaw/Fancy died unmarried and childless in 1685. Other than the 20 shillings William Fancy bequeathed to his son in 1675, there is no other record of Joseph Fancy in Brookhaven Town records.

Hannah, Rachel and William, Jr. are named by William Fancy’s second wife Katherine, in her October 17, 1684 Will. Hannah Fancy married (1) Robert Goulsbury, who died 1683, and (2) David Jennings/Jenners about 1684. Rachel married Peter Whiteheare (Whitaker/Wittier) before October 25, 1684.

June 17, 1675, Will of William Fancy (Attachment B) – "Very aged and a cripple". Body to be buried in Brookhaven. "Sonne Samuel ffancy" to have half of "my accommodation. That is one halfe of my home lott and Seaven ackers in the ould feild, and one halfe of all the ouot land Devided and undevided, and one half of all my meadow at the ould mans, and all my pt of medow and upland in ye ould purchase at the south". Samuel is not to sell any of it, it is for his heirs forever. "Beloved wife Katherine ffancy" is to have the other half of the accommodation and the whole meadow at Conscience except 20 shillings, to my "sonne Joseph ffancy". "My sonne William "ffancy" is to receive his portion after the death of wife Katherine. "Daughter "Hanah ffancy" is to receive two cows, or ten pounds, to be paid when she comes of age or marries. "Daughter Rechell" has already received her portion. William Fancy instructs that his Will be kept by neighbor widow Martha Smith (wife of Arthur Smith) as long as he lives. The Will was witnessed by John Thomas and Martha Smith, widow.

William Fancy probably died in early 1677, as his Will was proved in the Court of Sessions in Suffolk County on March 8, 1677. His name continues in Brookhaven records up to the last land draw in 1774 as his right is exercised by whomever it was transferred to by himself or his widow. Otherwise, 1677 is the last entry date for William Fancy in the Brookhaven Town records.

Katherine (also spelled Catherine and Katteren in the records) Fancy’s name continues until 1684 when she executes her last land transfer and makes her Will. She is quite active in seeing that her step-son Samuel Fanshaw/Fancy receives care. Also, she transfers and receives land from Robert Goulsbury and wife Hannah, her daughter. She received a bounty for killing of a wolf that was probably killed by her son or son-in-law.

Katherine Fancy’s Will, dated October 7, 1684, witnessed by Richard Smith and Richard Woodhull, was proved in the Court of Sessions March 22, 1687/8. Katherine Fancy left the meadow at Conscience she inherited from her husband to "daughter Rachells" youngest son "whom she hath or Shall have by Peter Whiteheare of Brookhaven". The meadow is left to Whiteheare’s son on the condition that Whiteheare pay 5 pounds in cattle to William Fancy (Jr.) and 5 pounds to Hannah (Fancy) Jenners within one year after her death. Robert Goulsbury, the son of Hannah (Fancy) Goulsbury Jenners, is to receive a three year old heifer and calf by her side when he reaches 16 years of age from Peter Whiteheare. Hannah Jenners is to receive one cow, and Peter Whiteheare’s youngest children are to receive the rest of any remaining cattle. The land that was given to Katherine by the town is given to Peter Whiteheare.

William Fancy was married twice. The name of his first wife is unknown, being referred to only as Goodwife, or Goodie, in the New Haven Colony records. She probably died after the April 14, 1646 punishment received at the hands of the New Haven authorities and before William Fancy purchased the house in Southold in 1652. Goodwife had at least one son, Samuel. William must have married his second wife Katherine shortly after the death of his first wife. The British occupation of Long Island during the Revolutionary War destroyed any early church records in this area that might have contained births and marriages for this family. The birth mothers of William’s other children are unknown, but it is presumed that Hannah, William, Jr., and Rachel are the children by second wife Katherine, because they are named in her Will.

Children of William Fancy:

Samual
Joseph
Hannah
William, Jr.
Rachel